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Ben Affleck and Matt Damon Cursed

Ben Affleck[1]

via www.andsoitbeginsfilms.com

Slate’s culture blog, browbeat, asks of there’s a Good Will Hunting curse on Ben Affleck and Matt Damon?

NW Boomer says no, but what about Robin Williams and director Gus Van Sant?

Robin and Gus will work it out if there is a curse, but there’s help for Ben and Matt.

Writers Sharan Shetty and Holly Allen suggest the only way to beat the curse is for the two actors to join forces again.

Both men have played WWII, so a WWII saga might be just right. An ideal story would have them play officers at the end of the War in the Pacific.

Matt was Private Ryan in Europe, but Ben knows the Pacific.

Instead of a story that follows the historical timeline, they need a movie about the internal wars fought on both sides.

The Japanese had plenty of conflicts to overcome, and they addressed them in a brutal manner. The Americans had different versions of similar problems, but they’ve never been explored.

In Flying Home, Matt and Ben have a chance to portray people never before seen on the silver screen. They’ll do good by being bad, real bad, war crimes bad, if America had lost.

They’ll save lives, but not the most innocent.

Boomer America needs a baby boomer movie with Mr. Affleck in the director’s chair. With this movie he’ll go down in history as the man who showed GenX, GenY, and the Millennials what total war looks like, and how one man with his heart in the right place can safe an entire city from destruction.

The Good Will Hunting curse, if there is one, needs to be addressed by a movie one part Good Will Hunting, one part Forrest Gump, and one part Titanic.

The major and minor characters make room for veteran actors seeking redemption as well as those on the rise. Most important it will be another stepping stone for Ben Affleck to stand on until he dwarfs all other actor/directors.

Argo put him in the right direction.

Added together, the final result will be the movie people in the future will point to and say, “That’s what war is.”

The script is one written in screenwriting class, vetted by Hollywood readers and contest analysts.

It passed the sniff test.

Ben, it’s me, Dave.

About David Gillaspie
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